Tag: roadside

Sunday Afternoon in the Shadow of the Tunkhannock Viaduct

Sunday Afternoon in the Shadow of the Tunkhannock Viaduct

Exactly one year ago today, I set off from Long Island on Sunday morning with a bug in my ear to see a concrete railroad bridge in northeastern Pennsylvania. It’s called the Tunkhannock Viaduct or the Nicholson Bridge.

At the time it was built in the 19-teens it was the worlds largest concrete structure. Today, almost 100 years later it is still an impressive sight. I dare say it is arresting when you head north along US 11 and it comes in to view.

Why would I ride over 200 miles each way to stand in front of some concrete bridge? The answer is simple. I don’t know.

What is it that you get from being in the presence of something inanimate versus simply looking at pictures of it online or in a book? Again, I don’t know. But… there is something.

Sometimes it seems like my trips to things sprinkled around the country answer questions that I don’t realize that I’m asking. Standing in their shadow makes me feel something. I guess maybe that’s what I’m after – to feel something. To know something with the cells of my body before my mind has time to scramble it up.

It’s nice to see a place that is proud of the hallmarks of their community. Something about it gives me a lovesick envy.

And away we go.

Route 66 Pit Stop: Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park

Route 66 Pit Stop: Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park

After getting to know the Blue Whale of Catoosa for a bit, it was time to turn around and head back towards the east. Following Route 66 I passed through the town of Foyil, Oklahoma.

My GPS favorites screen showed an entry for a Totem Pole. It was just a few miles that-a-way. Since I didn’t know if I’d ever pass that way again, I decided it was a good idea to stop and have a look.

A good idea, it was. I found myself at Ed Galloway’s Totem Pole Park, where the man himself had begun working on his creations in 1937. Though he passed on in the early 60’s, his legacy is now cared for by the Rogers County Historical Society.


At 60 feet tall, this is the world’s largest concrete totem pole.


Turtlescent.


Fiddle House.
Sadly I arrived before the gift shop was open. I was hoping to buy a postcard or maybe a sticker or something.


A nice place for a roadside snack.


Arrowhead


🙂

If you should find yourself in the neighborhood of Foyil, Oklahoma one day – don’t skip a visit to the Totem Pole park. It’s definitely worth the stop. Seeing such wonderful works of art which were crafted “just because” does the heart good.

The world’s largest concrete totem pole was pretty nifty 😃

A video posted by Rachael (@fuzzygalore) on

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Bull Durham Ghost Ads and a Pink Elephant

Bull Durham Ghost Ads and a Pink Elephant

Like a dumbbell, I brought my (3rd partially broken) point-n-shoot camera with its nifty 30x zoom with me… but failed to charge the battery. One day I’ll get this all right, but this? This was not that day. And so I was left to take pictures with my iPhone and my GoPro which on the whole isn’t really so bad. But, the zoom situation can be a little less than optimal. I hope you can manage to suffer through these photos.

“I come in peace.”

Tucked within the recesses of my GPS’ favorites was something called “BDS-32-54-04.” Though I wasn’t sure exactly what I would find when I pulled up, just by looking at the name I knew I’d saved a “Bull Durham Sign” from the Mail Pouch Barnstormers site. That’s their naming convention.

Wow, would you look at that? A tobacco ad that is loved, cared for and has been restored. Does that warm the ole ticker or what?

The kicker to my whole interest in tobacco advertising is that I find smoking and chew to be disgusting. I have memories of being trapped in the backseat of my parents car as a kid while they both puffed away in a blue-gray fog and it makes me want to gag. Apparently secondhand smoke wasn’t much of a concern back then.

This one wasn’t a GPS favorite or anything. I just happened to see it when I parked at the Bull Durham sign in Waverly, NY. I pulled around to the backside of the parking lot to get a better look. There is so much overlap, so much fade that I’m not able to discern what’s going on here. But the location came up on Barnstormers as having a Mail Pouch ad. I think I can see the word “pouch” on the upper left in yellow.

[edit] After googling soap ghost ads, I think that one of the layers may be for Ivory Soap. I found a soap add on Pinterest that tipped me off.

Towns like Waverly, NY that reach back a few hundred years and have a railroad line running through them seem to have the best shot at seeing ghost ads. Thinking back to other places I’ve been, Waverly had that look much like Renovo, PA and East Liverpool, OH did.


Pressing east…

I stopped to have a drink and a granola bar alongside a pink Elephant in Owego, NY. I mean, it really was as good a place to stop and take a breather as any, right? Maybe even better than most. It isn’t every day that you get to bask in the glory of such a fine beast.

The cockpit of my faithful companion. I don’t know if I took this picture on purpose or by accident, as I’m wont to do. Either way – the KTM is an excellent dance partner.

A lovely old sign in Owego provided me with some shade as I sipped and snacked.

Another Bull Durham sign perfectly perched above the olde tyme Harris Diner in Owego.

I didn’t really explore or dilly-dally around Owego as I was running out of time to get back to meet Kenny. So I snapped a quick photo of a You Are Here mural while sitting at a traffic light and made my way out of town. If I’m ever in the area again, something tells me I should have a closer look around. There are probably more roadsidey gems sprinkled through town.

The Route 6 Giant Chicken Army

The Route 6 Giant Chicken Army

It’s been a while since I posted any news from the front lines of the Giant Chicken Army. But that is about to change, my friend. On Route 6 in the town of Wyalusing, Pennsylvania I stumbled across a mass-gathering of the feathered fiends.

Behold!


Apparently they come in all flavors :-/

Up the road a piece I also saw the tank unit. You’ve been warned.

Other Posts about the Giant Chicken Army

I Revved My Engine But He Just Sat There Like A Log

I Revved My Engine But He Just Sat There Like A Log

When I first passed this guy on the bench I thought, wow, what a beautiful view by that little fishin’ hole. But the deep recesses of my brain must’ve recognized that something wasn’t quite right with him as I zipped by.

Waaaaaaait… I thought and pulled a u-turn.

When I pulled the KTM up behind him, he didn’t bat an eyelash or crane his neck to see who was there. No, he just sat there like… a log.

A log! Get it? He IS a log! HAHAHAHAHAHAHA! HA…HAHA…HA…whoooo 😉

Whoever put that little vignette together must get a kick out of it. When you don’t examine too closely it really looks like a person sitting there. Locals must think that guy sure loves to fish as they pass by day in day out.

Some friends have said that I have a knack for finding silly roadside things. But I swear, they’re everywhere! Maybe I’ve just got my antenna up for them all the time.

2016 Rearview: A Few of My Favorite Things So Far

2016 Rearview: A Few of My Favorite Things So Far

With month number six of 2016 drawing to a close, I’ve seen some pretty terrific roadside-y things in my travels so far. Wanna take a peek?

Mighty Joe – Shamong, NJ

Super-terrific hot dog guy at the super-tiny diner Winsted Diner – Winsted, CT

Flyin’ Pig – Miller Place, NY

Patriotic tire-Minions with braces – Somewhere in CT

Hippie Bunyan Muffler Man on Yasgur’s Farm – Bethel, NY

Purple Dragon – Duncannon, PA

Nifty Shed – Somewhere in CT

Giant Mr. Potato Head – Hasbro – Pawtucket, RI

Just Love Everybody Peace House – Somewhere in CT

A great sign! 🙂

Roy Lichtenstein’s Tokyo Brushstroke I & II – Watermill, NY

Picasso Garage – Somewhere in CT

Hotdog Johnny’s – Buttzville, NJ

Alexander Calder’s Stegorsaurus – Hartford, CT

Pig Bus – Somwewhere in PA

Rainbow – Hartford, CT

Welcome to Hackettstown Mural – Hackettstown, NJ

Monkey Mural – Bridgeport, CT

Hope for Peace barn – Somewhere in CT

Mail Pouch Tobacco House – Lock Haven, PA

Big Bronze Crows – Kent, CT

Here’s to continued whimsy-spotting throughout the year ::cheers::

A Sunday Ride to Burlington, Vermont

A Sunday Ride to Burlington, Vermont

The phone sitting on the seat of my Tiger rings.

“Hey, babe. What’s going on?”

“Wow, you went far. What are you doing?”

“I’m standing in a gas station eating a turkey sandwich. I’m at my turn around point. I just rode 300 miles to take a photo.”

“Not a surprise.”

On Sunday I opted to make the most of the waning summer weather and set off to Burlington, Vermont. My plan was to take a photo of the Whispering Giant that stands there in Battery Park.

fuzzygalore tiger on vermont route 100

I’m going to let you in on a little secret. When you ride 300 miles to a place, you have to ride 300 miles back to return to where you came from.

Once I’d snapped my photos and had some Gatorade, I began my long trek back home. Knowing that I would be able to catch a late 10pm ferry if I had to, I opted to follow Vermont Route 100 south until the daylight ran out. No point in hurrying if I didn’t have to.

Though I’ve spent the last four decades going through the process, each autumn when the sun begins to set earlier it still smarts. That feeling of having to squeeze the last of the summer juice out of each day never gets any easier.

tow-mater made of hay in vermont

It was pretty great to spy a Tow-Mater made of hay along Route 7 in Vermont. There were several other hay sculptures along the way as well as a big metal robot-like man and a huge jug of maple syrup that I didn’t stop for. I hate when I do that. Now I’ll have to go back and check them out.

How many times do I have to tell myself – just stop for the damned thing!

giant fireplug jack

I did manage to stop for this awesome jack-like sculpture made of fireplugs. It was right on the main drag in the town of Shelburne, Vermont. I had seen a photo of it on Tracy’s Instagram feed from when he was moseyin’ through the northeast. I couldn’t resist getting a closer look. Pretty nifty, huh?

chief grey lock burlington vermont whispering giant

This is Chief Grey Lock – the reason I found myself in Burlington, Vermont. There is something about the way his mouth and teeth are carved that I really like. He stands 24 feet tall to the top of his feathers and is in pretty good shape overall.

So after this visit, that leaves just one more Whispering Giant on my close proximity list, the one in Laconia, New Hampshire. Though I still have a few weeks before the grand tour comes to a close at the end of October, I’ll have to make a concerted effort to get up there to see it. But, I suppose anything is possible.

Road Tripping: The Coffee Pot – Bedford, Pa

Road Tripping: The Coffee Pot – Bedford, Pa

There was a time when visiting the Bedford Coffee Pot was one of those things that just nagged and nagged me. Way over on the western half of Pennsylvania, it seemed lightyears away. In truth it is a mere 330 miles that for whatever reason may as well have been a million. Maybe it can be chalked up to some type of mental roadblock or… maybe sometimes the wishing for something is just as satisfying as the getting. Daydreams are perfect where life isn’t.

Then on winter Tuesday in 2009 I found myself at the coffee pot. Just like that. You wake up one day and finally just do whatever it is you want.

breadbox at the coffee pot

Then on a trip to Cleveland in December 2013 with my mom and daughter, we once again stopped at the Coffee Pot. Doing something once can make it a lot easier to do again. The roadblocks aren’t there anymore.

bedford coffee pot

In July of 2015, I stopped by the Coffee Pot yet again. This time on my motorcycle. You know, just to check on things.

fuzzygalore at bedford coffee pot

Nothing much had changed since the last time I visited. Considering the life that these roadside giants can endure, that was a good thing.

 

Non-Moto: Yarnbombed Trees at the Long Island Museum

Non-Moto: Yarnbombed Trees at the Long Island Museum

In Stony Brook, New York at the Long Island Museum there are a 5 gorgeous yarnbombed trees on the grounds. The colorful swirls on the tree coats combined with the spindly tree limbs make me think of a wild undersea creature – maybe a psychedelic octopus.

yarnbombed trees at long island museum

Without any know-how in the crochet department, when I got up close to the work I wasn’t able to understand how these yarnbombs even work. I thought there would be some obvious “seam” or something like that. But my untrained eye didn’t pick up on anything. That only adds to my amazement. They look like they were don’t with great care. As Spongebob would say – “a sweater with love in the stitches.”

Aren’t they awesome?

 

Hooked@LIM:
The Crocheted Tree Project
The Long Island Museum
1200 New York 25A
Stony Brook, NY 11790

 

-removed-

 

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