The Ural Tool Kit – A Blessing and a Curse?

The Ural Tool Kit – A Blessing and a Curse?

the ural patrol tool kit

When you pop open the trunk of your new Ural, you’ll find a very nice tool roll that includes a set of tire irons and… get this, a pair of gloves and a manual pump stashed inside.Β To date, this is the nicest standard tool kit I’ve seen with any bike I’ve ever bought.

ural tool kit

Β Of course the humor in the fact that my Ural needs such a nice tool kit straight from the factory isn’t lost on me πŸ˜‰

7 Replies to “The Ural Tool Kit – A Blessing and a Curse?”

  1. You’re going to be adding to it as you go along….trust me. Oh, and one of the first additions should be a BFH or Big Fine Hammer….you’ll find out why.

    The toolkit has really come a long way from the old days of Soviet manufacturing. The tools used to be cheap pot metal quality and would not really last long. Now, the tools are made in Italy of all places!

    Careful with the tire pump, it’s not very “durable”.

  2. throw the pump away immediately and replace it with something that works. I’d also add a vice grips and a small piece of 2×4.

    the small piece of 2×4 (perhaps only 4-6 inches) is used to ease getting the bike on the center stand. roll the rear tire onto it, and then it lifts much much easier.

    1. Will do on the 2×4!

      I actually have a full tool bag & compressor. This isn’t my first motorcycle πŸ˜‰

      I was just kind of commenting how nice the kit was compared to what I have gotten to date with any other motorcycle πŸ™‚

        1. That’s what I hear! Over and over. And over. πŸ˜†

          It actually gets kind of depressing to have everyone keep driving that point home. Do you ever find that to be the case?

          I’m kind of under the impression that most people don’t buy a Ural and think it’s going to be like riding a Honda Goldwing.

          If you seek one out, you probably did a little research, a little reading about what you’re getting in to. Does it ever get to you?

          [edit] BTW – i’m not getting snarky with you – just speaking generally. I just realized that might be lost in type.

          1. yes, it gets repeated often by nearly every moto rider I encounter. it is annoying. for my riding purposes in the winter, it seems to be the easiest way to do it (maybe the cheapest as well if you just look at initial price and not TCO). hard to get 2wd and reverse without spending a bunch of money.

            however, if i compare the bikes in my garage and look at value & quality for a new bike vs the ural, the ural falls flat. i bought my WR250R new, it has yet to have a mechanical (knock on wood). the ural has had more than i can count with my fingers and toes in the same three year period. Even compared to my 12 year old SV650, the ural gets creamed on reliability and maintenance. build quality too. low quality metal and “paint” on the ural.

            I’ve been thinking a lot lately on what my plan is for the ural. it will eventually fail, and i will need to replace it. will i buy another ural? jury still out on the one. I’m leaning for a sidecar on a more reliable, lower maintenance motorcycle with a bigger choice of tires, better brakes, fuel injection, and maybe even ABS.

            I’m not trying to be rant or whine or be overly negative. I enjoy riding my ural, and i knew what i was getting into when i bought it. I hope you have much better luck with yours than I have had with mine.

  3. That looks pretty similar to the toolkit that came with my old BMW airhead. I actually tried the hand pump and it took over 150 pumps to get the tire from 25 to 32 psi. I now have a CyclePump but still carry around the hand pump. Plus it has nice welded in mounts under the seat.

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