Tag: roadtrip

World Famous Crochet Museum – Joshua Tree, California

World Famous Crochet Museum – Joshua Tree, California

In the town of Joshua Tree, California at the gateway of the National Park, sits another glorious American institution – the World Famous Crochet Museum. While on a riding trip in January of 2020, I stopped in for a visit.

A what…? you might ask. Well, have a look:

Nestled in the belly of a cheerfully repainted former 1-hour photo kiosk, museum visitors are treated to wall-to-wall, floor to ceiling, wholesome treasures. Each piece lovingly hooked and looped into being. Crocheted objects fill the space – and your heart with smiles.

While inside, little vignettes of similar genres come into view. Oh, look, it’s the watermelon slice section! There were clusters of poodles, desserts, sushi and clowns. You’ll also fine bears, sea critters, cakes, rabbits and more.

But what really caught my eye was the dainty amigurumi bathroom suite.

Yes, indeedy – a full bathroom set. Not just a sink. Not just a tub. Nope! Guests are treated to the whole shebang including a toilet and rug. It’s safe to say that whoever made this little ensemble doesn’t do anything half-assed. They’re whole ass all day in every way.

Just ask yourself – wouldn’t you want to be friends with the type of person who crochets a tiny toilet on a Tuesday night? I think we can both agree the answer is ‘yes.

The pink frosted donut was of course near and dear to my chubby little heart. A thing of beauty, really.

Before leaving, I left a little donation and took a sticker from the museum. Places such as this keep the child inside our heart giggling.

If you’re in the area, it’s worth the stop.

(Enjoy my squeaking boots!)

It came as a surprise to find a Rokon Trailbreaker leaned up against the wall, baking in the sun like a 2-wheel drive James Dean. If James Dean were a nerd who wore orthopedic shoes, that is.

World Famous Crochet Museum
61855 Highway 62
Joshua Tree, California

Serendipity is a… Giant Rocking Chair?

Serendipity is a… Giant Rocking Chair?

“Babe! You’re never going to believe where I’m standing right now!”
“Where?”
“In front of the world’s largest rocking chair!”
“Why am I not surprised?”
“Actually, I ended up here completely by accident.”
“Of course you did.”

My husband Kenny’s sarcasm came through loud and clear, even in text. It’s one of those things you learn to interpret after you’ve been partnered for a while. But, for all his disbelief that I hadn’t sought out the giant rocker – it was true.

While bumbling along The National Road in Illinois, I saw a sign for the World’s Largest Wind Chimes. Look… when something like that is advertised on a road sign? You visit it. It could go one of two ways: A fantastic triumph of roadsidery -or- a letdown of epic proportions. Both scenarios could be a win.

When I pulled in to Casey, Illinois following the signs for the chimes I was treated to a fantastic display of roadside Americana. Not only were there giant wind chimes (which you can ring), but sweet holy moly, there was a giant rocking chair, a mailbox, a pencil, a metal cactus. Holy crap, this place was awesome!

Big things, small town.

Casey wasn’t on my radar to visit, I’d just been passing through. Perhaps the universe tugged me there.

Seen, Unseen and the Route 66 Encyclopedia

Seen, Unseen and the Route 66 Encyclopedia

Route 66 holds sway over my imagination. I know, it’s just a road. And yet, for me something about it transcends that. I can’t be alone in this thinking because it has evolved in to a cultural icon. Maybe it has something to do with being built on ideas, hope and possibility.

Though I’ve traveled parts of 66 in Illinois, Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma – in many ways I am more sure than ever that so much was unseen. There is a feeling of a secret beyond the veil and a need to look closer, look longer. Coming home from those stretches of road, I am more curious about what I saw than when I left. Now I know there is a story to be told about what I saw versus going in search of answers about a story that I’d already known. It may seem semantic, but to me there is a difference.

A few months ago, I bought a book called The Route 66 Encyclopedia by Jim Hinckley. The book does a great job of intertwining history, photographs, references to old travel guides and materials. It is.. encyclopedic, really. Peppered all throughout the pages are delicious bites of history for the 66-curious.

When I first got the book, I thought it might inspire me to seek out the things in its pages. But when it arrived and I gave it a cursory look-over, I put it aside and there it stayed for a month or so. For some reason, I didn’t want to know about what I was going to be looking at prior to my trip out to Oklahoma.

When I returned home from my road trip, it was only then that I’ve been able to turn my attention back to the book. Now I want to know about what I’ve seen. What was that crumbling facade? What was in that blank space? How did that town spring up in the middle of nowhere? Now those blank spaces have shape, line and form and I can learn about them. If I did it in reverse the ideas would have been too abstract to appreciate. Or maybe too overwhelming. There is so much to feel in a couple thousand miles. Maybe pre-programming myself was subconsciously too much? I dunno. I’m just riding the wave.

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