Tag: port jefferson

Fatbike Long Island – Big Dune Buggy

Fatbike Long Island – Big Dune Buggy

You can file Pirate’s Cove under one of those places that I have overlooked for far too long.

fatbike long island sound side

On Saturday morning, with the sky bright and blue I made my way over to the Cove so that I could relax and do some beach riding. It was another one of those days where I had the whole place to myself. Meanwhile… the mall was packed with cars. ::shrug:: Oh well, lucky me!

pirates cove port jefferson

The view from up on the sandy hills is awesome. Unfortunately, photos flatten out just how high they are when you’re on top of them.

long island fatbike

I rode along the shoreline, up the hill from the west and headed up to the tallest section to the east.

fatbike long island

You get to take in so much from that vantage point. Being in a place that feels “tall” on Long Island is kind of hard to come by.

view from pirates cove

When I mounted up and began to roll down the hill, it occurred to me that being a clumsy ass and all, I might break my neck. Miracle of miracles, I managed to keep myself upright. Maybe I’m finally becoming a graceful swan? Nahhhhhhhhhh.

riding down the dune in pirates cove

Potato, Potahto – Who Cares? Let’s Fix My Bike

Potato, Potahto – Who Cares? Let’s Fix My Bike

Don’t you just hate it when you lose a front brake caliper bolt when you’re riding your motorcycle? Yea. Me too.

When I pulled into the parking lot in town on Sunday night, I gave the Husky brake lever a squeeze as I approached the entrance booth. Instead of gliding to a gentle stop I was met with metallic crunching sound, an odd feel on the lever and well, no brakes.

Without actually knowing what was wrong, it was obvious what was wrong. I leaned towards Kenny who was riding next to me and said, “I think my front brake caliper just fell off.”

This of course was met with a look that said, “Whaaaat?” without saying a word. He may or may not have slowly opened his helmets sunshade for dramatic “are you crazy?” effect.

The parking lot entrance booth
The parking lot entrance booth.

I rolled myself past the booth and pulled directly in front of it to get out of the way of the incoming traffic. I hopped off the bike and saw indeed that my front brake caliper was cocked back and  balancing along the edge of the brake rotor. The lower bolt had sacrificed itself to the road gods somewhere on my short journey.

Like my own personal pit crew – in about 2 seconds flat Kenny had parked his bike, jettisoned his gear, walked back to me and began looking at my front wheel. If you don’t already have your own pit crew, you might consider getting one. It is a very nice service.

While he was laying on the hot summer asphalt next to my front wheel, he struck the pose of a man with a purpose who was actually doing something other than, you know – hanging out on the blacktop near the 2 lanes of traffic by a parking entrance booth.

From out of the parking booth right behind us, a squeaky teenaged voice said, “you can park your bike in any spot anywhere in the lot.

I turned and looked at her, smiled and politely and said, “If I could, I would.

Actually… my look probably wasn’t entirely polite. It may have appeared more along the lines of “Really? You’re kidding. I can PARK in the spaces in this PARKING LOT? You mean everyone who comes into this lot on a motorcycle doesn’t strip off all of their gear and lay down on the hot blacktop RIGHT HERE and poke at the moving parts on their bike ALL the time?”

But I did smile.

I took a quick walk around the entrance driveway to see if my bolt had by some chance wiggled itself out there. Of course, it was nowhere to be found. We had to figure out some other quick fix.

With the caliper shoved back into its normal position on the disc, I pushed the bike over into the motorcycle parking spaces. You know, because I can park in any of them. We just needed something to steady the caliper in it’s rightful place since I didn’t have another bolt. Some safety wire or … Oh! A zip tie would do.

“We could just zip tie it in place for now,” I said.

“You mean wire tie?” Kenny replied.

::blink:blink:: “What? Yes. Wire tie.”

It was at this moment that I finally realized that men are indeed from Mars and women from Venus. We were saying the same damned thing. Zip tie, wire tie, cable tie, potahto – whatever you want to call it, let’s just go ahead and fix my bike.

I swear. It’s hard to find good help that won’t talk back these days.

zip tied caliper

I’m happy to report that the temporary fix worked like a charm and that my caliper bolt has been replaced.

I have also docked Kenny’s pay for being insubordinate. Beatings will continue until morale improves.

Which do you say?

Zip, cable or wire tie?

More Motorcycle Conversations on the Ferry

More Motorcycle Conversations on the Ferry

On board the Port Jefferson ferryOn Saturday, I rode in to Port Jefferson to hop the ferry. I was heading to Connecticut to meet up with another motorcycle blogger: Chris from EverydayRiding.org who is currently on road trip exploring the Northeast.

When I rode my Speed Triple into ferry parking lot there was a couple on a Harley-Davidson cruiser already waiting to board the boat. We exchanged smiles and a “hi”. I pulled in behind them in the line, hopped off my bike and watched the seemingly never-ending line of cars unloading from the boat that’d just come in.

The gregarious gentleman from the couple turned toward me, smiled and made some small talk.

“Howdaya like that Duc?”

“It’s a Triumph.”

“What?”

“It’s a Triumph.”

“Really?”

“Yea. I love it. “

He walked over to get a closer look at the marque on the gas tank. I can only imagine that he was double-checking my work.

“Oh, okay. Well,… I grew up on GSXAwwws, Ninjizzz,… sooo…”

In that moment I figured there must be something more that would follow the dangling “so,” but there wasn’t. It just trailed off to open-ended oblivion.

It pains me to come to the realization that I’ll never know what growing up riding Japanese sportbikes has to do with not being able to tell the difference between a Ducati and a Triumph.

Happy motorcycle man then walked around my bike and looked at the tires. He smiled at me and said,

“Looks like you aren’t using that whole front tire. You paid for it, you should probably use it.”

I chuckled in spite of myself and replied,

“I’ll see what I can do today!”

People are endlessly amusing 🙂

Biker Control – More Give and Take in Port Jefferson

Biker Control – More Give and Take in Port Jefferson

Motorcycle Parking Only in Port JeffersonI love spending time in the Town of Port Jefferson. I also love being a motorcyclist. It seems that these two interests are at odds with one another at times.

The town, in an effort to accommodate all of it’s visitors, has made some terrific improvements that cater directly to the motorcycle community. I am thankful for the new additions.

This season, the Brookhaven parking lot – where I have always preferred to park and congregate – was resurfaced and striped with motorcycle only parking (Yay!) In addition, the Business Improvement District (BID) donated a few great picnic tables in this area. There are new recycling cans and benches, as well. These are all great improvements and are most welcomed!

Now, there is even talk of allowing non-Brookhaven resident motorcyclists to park for free in the lot. This is a big move and in my opinion falls under special treatment. It’s a move I think that the riding community should appreciate. This is a big score for out-of-towners.

And yet, there is still a divide.

What is it about motorcyclists that strike some people as a “nuisance”? There is a new article posted on northshorelongisland.com entitled “Biker Control” that details some of this sentiment.

Bye bye benches

Following a brief discussion at Monday’s business meeting of the Village Board, Mayor Margot Garant ordered the removal of four benches from the sidewalk along Main Street in front of The Gap. Outgoing Village Trustee Leslea Snyder, at her final board meeting, suggested removing the benches “for the ease of pedestrians” and “to see if [the benches] need refurbishing.” However, the measure was weighed by village officials as a way to prevent bikers from congregating along that section of Main Street.

Biker Control
By Dave Willinger
Port Times Record

As a motorcyclist, I don’t require special treatment. I am absolutely fine with universally enforcing parking and town codes. I am fine being treated as equal to all other patrons or visitors. And a such, I hate the characterization that being a motorcyclist makes me unequal and puts me squarely into the problematic category, should I choose to sit on a bench in town and drink my coffee.

I completely agree that sidewalks need to be clear to allow pedestrians to get around easily. That is a valid argument in any town. But let’s call a spade a spade here. Again, we’re talking about one group of undesirable congregants.

There is clearly a perception about motorcyclists here that is working against us. How do we work towards altering this idea that we’re a bunch of barnacles clogging up the streets in the little port town?

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